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Criteria for Judging Portfolios

Page history last edited by PBworks 14 years, 7 months ago

Criteria for Judging Portfolios

 

The scoring sheet I use for their portfolios (English 1)

 

In addition to judging students based on how well they show me that they've learned the objectives for the semester, I also judge them on reflectiveness and how well they engaged in the process of assessing themselves. I resist calling the following a rubric, but I guess it is.

 

Rubric for judging reflectiveness of portfolio

I took a lot of language from an article/book I read, but I can't remember which right now. I'll put a citation up soon.

 

An Outstanding Portfolio (90-99)

The student:

• has a plan for the conference and is able to speak at length about his learning and achievement

• makes judgments about his work and is able to identify his achievements clearly and specifically in all categories of learning

• points to specific parts of his work and discusses how those parts demonstrate his learning with few prompting questions from the teacher

• clearly has a reason for everything he has selected to be in his portfolio and can articulate those reasons with few prompting questions from the teacher

• includes a wide variety of work that demonstrates his ability

• produces a neat and organized final portfolio product, including the table of contents, page numbers, post-it reflections, and outside decorations (if any)

 

An On-Track Portfolio (80-89)

The student:

• has a plan for the conference and speaks well about his learning and achievement

• makes some judgments about his work and is able to identify his achievements clearly and specifically in almost all categories of learning – he may be missing a few minor categories

• is able to identify assignments that demonstrates his learning and points out a few specific parts that demonstrate learning and achievement; may be able to speak more in depth with some prompting from the teacher

• clearly has a reason for everything he has selected to be in his portfolio and can articulate those reasons, albeit with some prompting from the teacher

• includes a wide variety of work that demonstrates his ability

 

An Emerging Portfolio (70-79)

The student:

• doesn’t have much of a plan for the conference and seems unprepared or unrehearsed

• is able to identify his achievements for many of the categories of learning, but not all

• may be able to point out assignments that demonstrate learning in connection to the categories of learning, but cannot point to any specific aspects of the assignment that demonstrate his achievement

• must be asked several questions by the teacher to speak reflectively about his work

• has included a few pieces in the portfolio for seemingly no reason and/or is missing a major type of work

 

An Off-Track Portfolio (65-69)

The student:

• has not demonstrated learning or achievement in most of the categories

• cannot explain what he has learned in the course, even though his work may show achievement

• must be asked many questions by the teacher in order to speak reflectively about his work

• has little purpose for selecting the work he included in his portfolio and/or is missing key types of work

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